Back: Two-piece
Varnish: Red
Upper Bout: 16.8 cm.
Lower Bout: 20.7 cm.
Neck: original, lengthened slightly by means of blocks glued on at the root
Body Length: 35.4 cm.
Center Bout: 11.1 cm.

Photos

Click on a thumbnail to view the full-size image.

  • front
  • side
  • back

Iconography Index

"Français on Guarneri", Stewart Pollens, The Strad, October, 1994, 1994.: Color photos (front & back).

"Italienische Streichinstrumente", Aloys Greither, Ars Musica, Heft 10 1973-1975.: Color photos (front, back & side).

"Paganini's Joseph", John Dunn, The Strad, 1926, October 1926.: Black-and-white photos (front & back).

"Poster supplement", The Strad, June, 1999, 1999.: Color photos (front, back & scroll).

"Seeking Mrs. Guarneri", Roger Hargrave, The Strad, September, 2000, 2000.: Color photos (scroll).

"True voice of Guarneri", John Dilworth, The Strad, June, 1999, 1999.: Color photos (front, back & scroll).

Antonius Stradivarius (Balfoort), Dirk J. Balfoort, The Continental Book Company, Stockholm, 1945.: Black-and-white photos (front, back & scroll).

Order Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesú (2 volumes), Carlos Chiesa, John Dilworth, Roger Graham Hargrave, Stewart Pollens, Duane Rosengard & Eric Wen, Peter Biddulph, London, 1998.: Color photos (front, back, side & scroll - large, high-resolution plates).

Italienische Geigenbauer (1957), Karel Jalovec, Artia, Prague, 1957.: Black-and-white photos (front, back, scroll & f-holes - dated 1742).

L'Esposizione di Liuteria Antica a Cremona nel 1937, Comitato Stradivariano, Cremona, 1938.: Black-and-white photos (front, back & side).

Old Violins, H. R. Haweis, John Grant, Edinburgh, 1910.: Black-and-white photos (front & back).

Ole Bull 2010: Guarneri del Gesu Collection, John Dilworth, Bergen, 2010.: Color photos (front, back, side & scroll).

The Strad Calendar 2009: The Museum Collection, London, 2008.: Color photos (front & back).

The Violin Makers of the Guarneri Family, W. Henry, Arthur F. & Alfred E. Hill, William E. Hill & Sons, London, 1931.: Color illustrations (front, back & side).

The Violin Masterpieces of Guarneri del Gesù, Peter Biddulph, Peter Biddulph, London, 1994.: Color photos (front & back).

Violins & Violinists (1969), Franz Farga, Frederick A Prager, New York, 1969.: Black-and-white photos (front, back, scroll & f-holes).

Notes

"The Paganini violin, known as "Il Cannone" (the Canon), because of the power and sonorous quality of its tone, was of all the instruments owned by Nicolo Paganini his favorite. Made by the renowned Cremona violin maker Guarneri (known as del Gesu) and considered one of his masterpieces, the violin has distinct features that set it apart from modern instruments, including a slightly shorter and thicker sound box, and a markedly curved neck. Its tone is distinctly bright, yet full. The violin has survived intact and whole and belongs to Genoa, a gift made in1837 by Paganini to his native city. The violin is played monthly in Genoa to preserve it in best condition and on special occasions. "Il Cannone" was last seen in New York as part of an exhibition devoted to Guarneri and his atelier at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1994.Because of the instrument's priceless value a security official from Genoa will accompany the violin to New York and an American guard will escort the instrument to the Banca Nazionale del Lavoro where it be remain until the performance."
http://www.milinabarrypr.com/clients/releases/oci_accardo_release.pdfhttp://www.milinabarrypr.com/clients/releases/oci_accardo_release.pdf
The Hill brothers list this instrument as made in 1742, but under ultraviolet light the last digit of the date is revealed as a 3, the lower sweep of the 3 having been rubbed away and leaving what looks, to the naked eye, like a very small 2.
Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesú (2 volumes), Carlos Chiesa, John Dilworth, Roger Graham Hargrave, Stewart Pollens, Duane Rosengard & Eric Wen, Peter Biddulph, London, 1998.

Provenance

Owner Owned From Owned In Owned Till Price paid
City of Genoa   1851       
Nicolò Paganini   1799    1840   
Livron      1799   
...         

Current owner Current owner
Indicates that the owner is or was also a musician Indicates that the owner is or was also a musician

Players

Name Played From Played In Played To
...       
Nicolò Paganini   1799    1840 
...       

Current player Current player
Indicates that the musician is or was also an owner of one or more instruments. Indicates that the musician is or was also an owner of one or more instruments

Certificates

Dendrochronological analysis: Peter Klein, Hamburg, 1998. Youngest ring is 1735.

References

Antonius Stradivarius (Balfoort), Dirk J. Balfoort, The Continental Book Company, Stockholm, 1945.

Order Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesú (2 volumes), Carlos Chiesa, John Dilworth, Roger Graham Hargrave, Stewart Pollens, Duane Rosengard & Eric Wen, Peter Biddulph, London, 1998.

Italienische Geigenbauer (1957), Karel Jalovec, Artia, Prague, 1957.

L'Esposizione di Liuteria Antica a Cremona nel 1937, Comitato Stradivariano, Cremona, 1938.

Old Violins, H. R. Haweis, John Grant, Edinburgh, 1910.

Ole Bull 2010: Guarneri del Gesu Collection, John Dilworth, Bergen, 2010.

The Strad Calendar 2009: The Museum Collection, London, 2008.

The Violin Makers of the Guarneri Family, W. Henry, Arthur F. & Alfred E. Hill, William E. Hill & Sons, London, 1931.

The Violin Masterpieces of Guarneri del Gesù, Peter Biddulph, Peter Biddulph, London, 1994.

Violins & Violinists (1969), Franz Farga, Frederick A Prager, New York, 1969.

"Français on Guarneri", Stewart Pollens, The Strad, October, 1994, 1994.

"Italienische Streichinstrumente", Aloys Greither, Ars Musica, Heft 10 1973-1975.

"Paganini's Joseph", John Dunn, The Strad, 1926, October 1926.

"Poster supplement", The Strad, June, 1999, 1999.

"Seeking Mrs. Guarneri", Roger Hargrave, The Strad, September, 2000, 2000.

"True voice of Guarneri", John Dilworth, The Strad, June, 1999, 1999.

"Violin Upstages Violinist", Joshua Kosman, San Fransisco Chronicle.

http://www.milinabarrypr.com/clients/releases/oci_accardo_release.pdfhttp://www.milinabarrypr.com/clients/releases/oci_accardo_release.pdf

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[130: Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesù, 1743... Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, March 15, 2011 10:11 PM
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Hi era,

From the x-rays taken of the "Cannon" there were originally four nails fixing the neck to the instrument. When the neck was lengthened (built up at the heel rather than grafted), four new nails were used to fix the blocked up neck again to the body. A stub of one of the four original nails, which evidently could not be removed, still remains in the heel.

The technical drawings you refer to were made by Cesare Candi when he did the "restoration" on the Cannone prior to its loan to Cremona for the Stradivari Bicentenary Exhibition. The drawings are identified as Candi's in the book by Carlo Nardi "Il Liutaio Cesare Candi e il Violino di Paganini". The drawings are not that accurate and incorporate some of Candi's own ideas on violinmaking rather than faithfully reproducing the what he found in the original. Candi's repair label is glued to the neck block of the violin and dated 1937. The original drawing are kept in the Genoa Music Conservatory.

Camillo Sivori who purchased the Vuillaume from Paganini had an accident where it was possibly in part revarnished. Nonetheless most copies by Vuillaume, although admirably made, are never really exact copies (what we would now call bench copies).

Bruce Carlson
Post #2667
Posted Tuesday, March 22, 2011 2:48 PM
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It looks like a George Chanot circa 1870 to me. I don't see any Cremonese characteristics from this violin.
Post #2679
Posted Thursday, March 24, 2011 9:15 PM
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Hi britain,

Which instrument are you referring to as being without Cremonese characteristics; the Vuillaume copy or the 'Cannone' by Guarneri 'del Gesù'?

Bruce
Post #2682
Posted Sunday, April 03, 2011 5:30 PM
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I am, referring to the violin in the picture of this post. Perhaps if there were more detailed pictures that would help to clarify the confusion.I will look for better pics and re-reply to this post.
Post #2703
Posted Sunday, April 03, 2011 5:40 PM
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I looked at the pics and found some better ones on A. Giordano's web sight and I have seen a few George Chanot's that are nearly identical. Are you certain this The Il Cannone is Italian? What type of joint was used at the corners? Can anybody answer this question. If it is not a blunt joint it is not Italian. Guarneri did not use the French mould.
Post #2704
Posted Sunday, April 03, 2011 6:27 PM
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Hi britain,

The rib joins at the corners, all four of them, are 'butt joints' exactly like other authentic 'del Gesù' instruments.

Bruce

EDIT: actually I prefer to call them overlapping joints as a 'butt' joint is usually close to a right angle. In the Cremonese system the C-bout curve on the corner blocks was prepared first and the C-bout rib glued into position. Then the curve was cut for the outer rib (upper or lower bout) together with the C-bout rib. Once the outer rib was glued in place and the outer rib trimmed back you can only see the wood of the outer rib. On some instruments by 'del Gesù' this outer rib actually sticks out slightly past the joint. This can be seen more frequently on the late instruments.

Of course the join was blackened after it was finished.
Post #2706
Posted Sunday, April 03, 2011 8:46 PM
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In regard to the c bout joining technique. I emailed Beare's regarding this subject and they replie in an email that most of the Italian makers from that time period used an inside mould, resulting in the type of join which I described. I wonder if this feature could be a way to partially ID a violin in regards to country of origin? But, I have seen other violins with this same characteristic that are apparently Bohemian or Tyrolian. What do you think?
Post #2708
Posted Monday, April 04, 2011 5:25 AM
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Quote britain;

"In regard to the c bout joining technique. I emailed Beare's regarding this subject and they replie in an email that most of the Italian makers from that time period used an inside mould, resulting in the type of join which I described. I wonder if this feature could be a way to partially ID a violin in regards to country of origin? But, I have seen other violins with this same characteristic that are apparently Bohemian or Tyrolian. What do you think?"

Hello britain,

This method of rib join is to be found in many different areas and different schools and because, when examining instruments, it is not "exclusive" to the Cremonese school it is not, in itself, proof of being Cremonese work but it can be used to "exclude" certain instruments as Cremonese. Any one feature has to be taken into account along with the rest of the details on an instrument to be able to formulate a valid opinion. Photographs are not enough.

In Tyrolean instruments even as early as Jakob Stainer, the Mittenwald school, Fussen, and many instruments from the Germanic areas can have this feature.

Bruce
Post #2709
Posted Monday, April 04, 2011 2:17 PM
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Yes I see. Also I have seen older German violins with mitered linings and blocks. so apparently that is not an exclusive Italian characteristic also.I suppose you could develop a "ranking" system of characteristics from each violinmaking school and judge the country of origin/authenticity on a point system. But certainly method of construction would be an important factor.If there is a doubt we usually acquire two independent opinions /appraisals to insure that the instrument is properly identified.
Post #2713
Posted Wednesday, April 06, 2011 12:24 PM
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It seems to me that the question of whether the Cremonese violin, or not - is absurd. I do not think that Achilles Paganini would buy the French or Austrian copy to pass it the city of Genoa. Another question - it is "Il Cannone" or not? It is known that Paganini had three violin Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesu. And the transfer of Genoa this violin was not a single close friend of Paganini, who could confirm that it is "Il Cannone". By the way, Bruce, I wanted to ask you. Is it true that when you changed the fingerboard on this violin, then on the back was the inscription - "Nicolaus Sawicki 1828? Another question - what is written on heel (tallone)? All photos of the violin (that I've seen) is very low quality or retouched, so that read the inscription on the violin not possible. But it would be very interesting to do it.

Sergey

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