Instrument

  • ID: 4058
  • Type: violin
  • Maker: Antonio Stradivari
  • Year built: 1711
  • City: Cremona
  • Name: Earl of Plymouth, Kreisler
 
Label: original: "Antonius Stradiuarius Cremonensis / Faciebat Anno 1711"
Back: Two-piece
Body Length: 35.5 cm.
Upper Bout: 16.75 cm.
Center Bout: 11 cm.
Lower Bout: 20.8 cm.

Photos

Click on a thumbnail to view the full-size image.

  • front
  • back
  • scroll
  • front
  • back
  • side

Iconography Index

Antonius Stradivarius (volumes I-IV), Jost Thöne & Jan Röhrmann (editors), photos by Jan Röhrmann, instrument descriptions by Alessandra Barabaschi, Jost Thöne Verlag, Cologne, 2010: Color photos (front, back, side, scroll & detail of C-bout & f-hole). Order

The Henry Hottinger Collection, Rembert Wurlitzer, Inc., New York, 1966: Black-and-white photos (front, back & side).

The 'Secrets' of Stradivari, Simone F. Sacconi, Eric Blot Edizioni, Cremona, 2000: Black-and-white photo (inside of back, label area).

Violin Iconography of Antonio Stradivari 1644-1737, Herbert K. Goodkind, Larchmont, New York, 1972: Black-and-white photos (front, back, side, scroll, f-hole & inside).


Notes

The Hill family discovered this instrument in 1926 in the Castle of the Earl of Plymouth, where it had been sitting for over 150 years.
The Henry Hottinger Collection, Rembert Wurlitzer, Inc., New York, 1966.

Provenance

Owner Owned From Owned In Owned Till Price paid
Los Angeles Philharmonic   1965       
Rembert Wurlitzer Inc.  1965    1965   
...         
Henry Hottinger (New York)  1952    1965   
Rembert Wurlitzer Inc.      1952   
Dorothea Powers Percival (New York)  1946       
Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.  1945    1946   
...         
Fritz Kreisler   1928    1945  For members only 
W.E. Hill & Sons  1928    1928   
...         
Earl of Plymouth         
...         

Current owner Current owner
Indicates that the owner is or was also a musician Indicates that the owner is or was also a musician

Certificates

Letter: Rembert Wurlitzer, New York, November 30, 1945. To Miss Dorotha Powers. Suggests that when the instrument was discovered in 1928 by Arthur Hill, it had not beem played since about 1750.

References

Antonius Stradivarius (volumes I-IV), Jost Thöne & Jan Röhrmann (editors), photos by Jan Röhrmann, instrument descriptions by Alessandra Barabaschi, Jost Thöne Verlag, Cologne, 2010. Order

The Henry Hottinger Collection, Rembert Wurlitzer, Inc., New York, 1966.

The 'Secrets' of Stradivari, Simone F. Sacconi, Eric Blot Edizioni, Cremona, 2000.

Violin Iconography of Antonio Stradivari 1644-1737, Herbert K. Goodkind, Larchmont, New York, 1972.

W. E. Hill & Sons Photographic Archive.

W. E. Hill Business Records (1850 - 1990).

"Anything Man Can Do . . .", Margaret Campbell, The Strad, August, 1971, 1971.

"How Many Strads? - Supplemental Remarks", Ernest N. Doring, Violins & Violinists, August-September, 1945, 1945.

"How Many Strads? - Supplemental Remarks", Ernest N. Doring, Violins & Violinists, July-August, 1946, 1946.

"Part Three of an Interview with Fritz Kreisler", Violins & Violinists, January, 1948, 1948.

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